Elizabeth Lissaman: New Zealand’s Pioneer Studio Potter 
Jane Vial and Steve Austin

AVAILABLE OCTOBER 2018

With a foreword by Justine Olsen – Curator of Decorative Arts at Te Papa, and an afterword by Rick Rudd – potter and Director of the Quartz Museum.

Elizabeth Lissaman: New Zealand’s Pioneer Studio Potter traces the life and works of New Zealand’s pioneering woman studio potter. It is fully illustrated with over 100 images, especially photographed, of Lissaman’s pottery selected from private and public collections. Illustrations also include images of her designs and historical family photographs. The biography is meticulously researched and … Continue reading

SEEDS OF LIFE: The Bone Art of Bruce Mahalski
Craig Hilton and Bruce Mahalski
With foreword by Billie Lythberg. Ph.D

‘Seeds of Life – the Bone Art of Bruce Mahalski’ is a new book by scientist and artist, Craig Hilton. It realises the symbiotic potential of art–science collaborations with an unrelenting intensity. Both Mahalski and Hilton are interested in the ethical and philosophical implications of using biological material (living and non-living) in art to critique what they see as outdated and ‘species-dangerous’ social norms. The ethics of collecting biological material and making art with it are also … Continue reading

DESIGN GENERATION: How Peter Haythornthwaite shaped New Zealand’s design-led enterprise
Michael Smythe
With an introduction and interview by Michael Barrett

This book tells the story of one of New Zealand’s most influential industrial designers. Spanning five decades, Design Generation documents Haythornthwaite’s career through childhood influences, education in Auckland and Illinois, work experience in California and New York, and teaching and consultant practice back in New Zealand. It chronicles his many roles as a design leader: as innovator of design, employer in private practices and his notable contribution to the wider field of design.  Vivid case studies of Haythornthwaite’s work illustrate the … Continue reading

CARBON EMPIRE
Allan McDonald

Winner New Zealand Photobook of the year award 2017.

Carbon Empire works in the space between art and documentary photography.

It combines a short series of staged photographs of a ‘man in the street’ made in 1997 with images of closed petrol stations photographed between 2003 and 2017.

Carbon Empire is a juxtaposition of these two series of photographs and a single image, made by chance in 2002.

The closed petrol stations reflect the effects of petroleum law changes across New Zealand. In 1988, the petroleum sector became deregulated, with the large international wholesalers able to … Continue reading

DYNAMO HUM

By Denys Watkins
Foreword by Matt Blomeley
Essays by Anna Miles and Francis McWhannell
Conversation with Allan Smith and Denys Watkins

Published by Rim Books in association with Bath Street Arts Trust.

Design by Index – Jonty Valentine

DYNAMO HUM is an artist book by Denys Watkins, featuring his paintings from 2004 to 2016.

Denys is a highly respected New Zealand contemporary artist. A long serving teacher of thirty-one years at Elam School of Fine Arts that, in 2011, he left to pursue full-time studio art practice.

Here he turns his multifaceted interests to creating … Continue reading

WHENUA FONUA ‘ENUA

Benjamin Work with photographs by Brendan Kitto
Interview with Benjamin Work by Giles Peterson

Published by Rim Books in association with Uxbridge Art & Culture.

Early Polynesian navigators gave names to the places they encountered as a reminder of the spiritual threshold between creation and reality. This was because they regarded the ideas of geographic and spiritual origin as mutually similar. Whenua Fonua ‘Enua explores the significance of name and place and the importance of these indicators that connect us to our past and highlight the characteristics of our present. Through new paintings and this companion publication in … Continue reading

BARRY BRICKELL READER: SELECTED ‘WRERTINGS’, MEDITATIONS, OUTBURSTS, DECREES AND DIVERSIONS

Edited by Gregory O’Brien
Photographs by Haruhiko Sameshima
Afterword by David Craig

Published by Steele Roberts Aotearoa in association with Rim Books.

Rim Books is absolutely ecstatic to be associated with publishing this book of ‘wrertings’ by the maverick New Zealand artist Barry Brickell.

Known for his decades of pottery making and mountain railway in Coromandel, he has dedicated his life to ceaseless art-making of all kinds. Less known but perhaps more revealing of his inner workings, are his passions for writing and reading, … Continue reading

TOM HUTCHINS: SEEN IN CHINA 1956
Edited by John B. Turner. Chinese translation by Han Niu.

Published by Turner PhotoBooks, Auckland/Beijing in collaboration with PhotoForum Inc, Auckland, NZ, 2016 as Photoforum issue 86.

English and Chinese text

This bi-lingual book was produced to coincide with the debut exhibition of photographs made in China 60 years ago by the pioneering New Zealand photojournalist and photographic educator, Tom Hutchins (1921-2007), presented at the 2016 Pingyao International Photography Festival.

‘On the platform there are many people waiting to cross the other way, waiting for the train back to Hong Kong. . … Continue reading

STOMP
Jon Carapiet

The photographs in STOMP, taken in Europe, India and Egypt since 2014, respond to the destruction of cultural identity and historical sites tracing back millennia, and today manifested by events from Bamiyan to Palmyra. STOMP explores themes of photographic portraiture and ‘the gaze’ in the context of destruction, questioning how we connect and identify with the other.

Since his first installation ‘Headlines’ in 1994 which featured images of a screaming Princess Diana and Prince Charles appropriated from the tabloid media, Jon Carapiet’s work has dealt with humanitarian and global themes as well as issues around … Continue reading

BRAINWASH-INGTON DC: A 1982 PHOTOGRAPHIC ‘ON THE ROAD’
Stuart Page

It features photographs Page took on a 6 month journey around USA that he made soon after his graduation from Ilam School of Fine Arts, where Shustak taught. It was an ambitious undertaking, funded by the NZ government arts council, and a rare opportunity for him to take his learning from the school into practice on the streets of where the art came from. Page says, in his introduction to the original exhibition of the resulting photographs in 1984:

“The most exciting and relative communication seemed to … Continue reading